An overview of the watergate scandal and constitutional crisis in 1972

Howard Hunt and G. Gordon Liddy, who led the Watergate break-in team, were stationed in a Watergate Hotel room while the burglary was underway.

An overview of the watergate scandal and constitutional crisis in 1972

History The Watergate Scandal: On June 17,The Washington Post published a small story. In this story the reporters stated that five men had been arrested breaking into the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee. The headquarters was located in a Washington, D.

These burglars were carrying enough equipment to wiretap telephones and take pictures of papers. The Washington Post had two reporters who researched deeply into the story.

Their names were Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward; they discovered that one of the suspects had an address book with the name and phone number of a White House official who could have been involved in the crime.

The Watergate Break-In

The reporters suspected that the break-in had been ordered by other White House officials. In a press conference on August inPresident Nixon said that nobody in the White House staff was involved in the crime.

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But when the burglars went to trial four months later, the story changed rapidly from a small story to a national scandal.

It ended only when Richard Nixon was forced to leave office. Watergate was connected to Vietnam; it eventually exposed a long series of illegal activities in the Nixon administration.

Nixon and his staff were found to have spied on and harassed political opponents and to cover-up illegal activities.

An overview of the watergate scandal and constitutional crisis in 1972

These crimes were known as the Watergate scandal. For years Nixon was carrying on the crimes and they had not come to light. Nixon had enemies which included liberal politicians, journalists and actors.

Nixon was so worried that during the Cambodia bombing he had to wiretap his own staff members. They had gotten the information from classified government documents. The papers blamed the policies that were created by the Nixon administration which caused the beginning of the war in Vietnam.

The Watergate Scandal was a series of crimes committed by the President and his staff, who were found to have spied on and harassed political. opponents, accepted illegal campaign contributions, and covered up their own misdeeds. On June 17, , The Washington Post published a small story. In the ensuing Watergate scandal, Hunt was convicted of burglary, conspiracy, and wiretapping, eventually serving 33 months in prison. Mitchell, John – [ 2, Pages, MB ] – John Newton Mitchell (September 15, – November 9, ) was the Attorney General of the United States from to under President Richard Nixon. It was the biggest political scandal and constitutional crisis in America, that led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon. It involved 5 burglars, all linked to the Nixon administration, breaking into the Watergate Complex, Washington DC, which was the head office of the Democratic national committee.

Daniel Ellsberg, a former employee, gave the documents to the NYT. Nixon became very upset by their publication. Nixon tried to charge Ellsberg with treason, but he was not content to take him to court. However, they discovered nothing incriminating. The plumbers continued to be involved in the next election.

Nixon was always worried about having enough votes for the election in Nixon was concerned that Edmund Muskie of Maine would win because he was the strongest Democratic candidate. Most of all, they sent a letter to the New Hampshire newspaper starting that Mr.

Muskie was making crude remarks about French Canadian ancestry.

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His supporters included many people who supported the civil rights, anti-war, and environmental movements of the s. McGovern had fought to make the nomination process more open and democratic. Congress had also passed the 26th amendment to the Constitution allowing eighteen-year-olds to vote.

As a result, the Democratic Convention was the first to include large numbers of woman, minorities, and young people among the delegates. The press revealed that his running mate, Thomas Eagleton, had once received psychiatric treatment.

At first McGovern stood by Eagleton. Then he abandoned him, picking a different running mate.Watch video · In the early morning of June 17, , five men are arrested for breaking into the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate, an office-hotel-apartment complex in Washington, D.C.

WATERGATE AND THE CONSTITUTION.

An overview of the watergate scandal and constitutional crisis in 1972

The Watergate scandal, starting with an illegal break-in at Democratic National Committee headquarters in June and ending with President gerald r. ford pardoning richard m.

nixon in September , produced one of the most significant constitutional crises in modern times. The Watergate Scandal was a series of crimes committed by the President and his staff, who were found to have spied on and harassed political.

opponents, accepted illegal campaign contributions, and covered up their own misdeeds. On June 17, , The Washington Post published a small story. The Watergate scandal began with a break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate Hotel and office complex on June 17, It eventually led to the resignation of.

The Watergate Scandal was a series of crimes committed by the President and his staff, who were found to have spied on and harassed political.

opponents, accepted illegal campaign contributions, and covered up their own misdeeds. On June 17, , The Washington Post published a small story. Oct 29,  · The Watergate Break-In.

The origins of the Watergate break-in lay in the hostile political climate of the time. By , when Republican President Richard M. Nixon was running for reelection, the United States was embroiled in the Vietnam War, and the country was deeply divided.

The Watergate Scandal - The Black Vault